Places to catch the Game #2: The Elands Bay Hotel

The One & Only

Location: Elands Bay (north of the train tracks – if you get to Lamberts Bay you know you’ve gone too far)
Locals: A mishmash of Swartland potato farmers, salty sea dog surfers, and crayfish poachers on the run from the law.
Tackling the bar: No “Bakkie Botha cleanouts” required

Eye's front

Pros:
1. Warm beds are available upstairs if post match celebrations push past the curfew
2. The patch of lawn out the back – you can ditch the family to get on with the weekly ritual of male bonding over a few cold ones and cussing the Aussie ref.

Beer Garden view

3. The ocean themed painted walls (with mermaids!) fits nicely with the super rugby franchise clocks.
4. Ample supply of Rooidop.

west coast vino

5. Dog friendly

Cons:
1. You’ll miss the early morning surf
2. There’s too much Rooidop – and many strafdops
3. That random 40-something male and his best friend, the ridgeback.
4. Seating at the big screen is a rare commodity
5. No offers of illegally procured crays were forthcoming.

There's No Piano Inside

BDR Rating: A Jannie de Beer five of the best!

PUNTE SUID-AFRIKA!

Player Profile: Bakkies Botha – Method Actor

We’ve all seen the glorious sight of Bakkies Botha’s fury unleashed on a rugby pitch as he rains blows down upon a helpless opponent trapped at the bottom of the ruck, but not many know that this man of steel had humble origins as a fine arts graduate.

The younger Bakkies graduated with a masters degree in Fine Arts from the University of Pofadder with stars in his eyes and a burning passion to reinvent the rules of stage theatre – he wanted to see his name in the lights on Broadway. Bakkies’ masters thesis was entitled “the Story of Winter – as told through the medium of interpretative dance” and his one man show was hailed by all who saw it as “a new direction for drama” (quote from the Pofadder Daily Post).

Bakkies performs his masters thesis - through the medium of interpretive dance. Picture courtesy of ESPN Scrum.

A short stint in Romanian cinema saw him take the role of the Little Shepherd Boy in the cult indie classic film “Pablo Finds a Pebble” and the future looked bright for our young actor who had left Pofadder armed only with the ambition in his heart, his faded Andy Warhol t shirt and a pair of really short shorts.

Soon Bakkies would be involved in avant-gard theatre performances throughout Eastern Europe as the former Soviet Union collapsed around him.  It was there, in a little dusky Warsaw theatre where Heyneke Meyer spotted Bakkies Botha and immediately recognized that he could solve Meyer’s problems at the Bulls.  Heyneke was looking to bolster his weak Bulls squad by adding the kind of man who rips faces off of Antipodeans for the sheer enjoyment of it.  Fortunately for South African rugby Bakkies just happened to be giving a particularly intense performance in the role of Hannibal Lecter that evening.  Heyneke offered him a Bulls contract on the spot after the show… and the rest is Springbok rugby history.

Bakkies went on to win Super rugby winners medals with the Bulls, Tri Nations gold, a World Cup winners medal and a win over the British Lions.   Along the way, he also managed to earn a bit of infamy for the odd eye gouge, a Jimmy Cowan headbutt (hey, who wouldn’t want to headbutt Jimmy Cowan?) and earned the respect of his peers by returning to the locker room at half time with a lock of George Smith’s hair.

You’ve still got a few years left in you Bakkies and place in your cabinet for one more Rugby World Cup medal.  Make little Makkies proud.